NOTE: This model is discontinued and may no longer be available to purchase new. See the latest mobile phones or compare used prices.

Nokia 5300 XpressMusic review

7.6/10 AVG.
RATING



7.6/10
Informr score
The Nokia 5300 XpressMusic currently has an Informr score of 7.6 out of 10. This score is based on our evaluation of 253 sources including reviews from users and the web's most trusted critics.


Operating system
Custom
Processor
Unknown
Screen Size
Unknown
Camera
1+ MP


What the Critics Are Saying...


Phonedog

Introduction & DesignIntroductionNokia has been pushing their high-end N-Series "multimedia computer" handsets in the United States over the past year, going so far as to open flagship stores in New York and Chicago where consumers can purchase the devices unlocked for use on T-Mobile, Cingular, and...

- Noah Kravitz, Phonedog
Phonedog

Introduction & DesignIntroductionNokia has been pushing their high-end N-Series "multimedia computer" handsets in the United States over the past year, going so far as to open flagship stores in New York and Chicago where consumers can purchase the devices unlocked for use on T-Mobile, Cingular, and...

- Noah Kravitz, Phonedog
Wired

 With zealous Apple followers preparing for the coming iRapture, getting a hold of a cell phone running OSX will be nothing short of a miracle. But for the nonbelievers and those without 500 friggin' dollars to dump on an iPhone, you've got options. If you just want to listen to tunes and make...

- Carlos Bergfeld, Wired
trustedreviews.com

Its ergonomics and general ‘usability' are very good, it has a superb screen, is small in the pocket, and I like the slider format a lot. In terms of the latter this handset has probably knocked away the last chink in my ant-slider feelings.

- trustedreviews.com
GSMArena

At first glance Nokia 5300 failed to impress us with its design and the materials used for its body. In fact we think that the white color and matt plastic with rubber elements make it look cheap. It's not among the slimmest devices either.But armed with the highly user-configurable S40 user interfa...

- GSMArena team, GSMArena


Prices (Where to Buy)




Common Questions


Nokia released the 5300 XpressMusic on February 6, 2007.


We've got you covered! Download a free PDF copy of the Nokia 5300 XpressMusic user manual here.


Nokia backs up the 5300 XpressMusic with a 1 year parts & labour warranty.


If your 5300 XpressMusic has problems and is still within its warranty period, you could contact Nokia support or the retailer you purchased the phone from. You'll find Nokia's contact information here. If your phone is off warranty and needs repair for a physical problem such as a broken screen or bad battery, you should visit an authorized service centre or a local phone repair shop. You can also connect with others in The Informr Community Forum to find and share answers to questions.



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Quick view

Screen Size
Unknown

The Nokia 5300 XpressMusic's screen size is Unknown with 320 x 240 pixels resolution.

Processor
Unknown
OS

The phone runs on the Other operating system (OS).

Camera
1+ MP

You can take photos or capture video with the phone's onboard 1+ megapixel camera.

There's no secondary front camera.

Storage
7 MB

Internal memory is 7 MB. An external, MiniSD (up to 2 GB) expansion slot is available for increased storage capacity.

Battery
Unknown

The phone is powered by a Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) battery. Nokia's performance ratings are 9.5 days standby time.

5300 XpressMusic Specs

Overview
Release date February 6, 2007
Regions available No
Networks
GSM:
850/1800/1900 MHz
Data:
GPRS, EDGE
SIM card Yes
Dual SIM No
Operating System Other
Processor No
Internal Flash Memory 7 MB
RAM No
ROM No
Digital compass No
Flightmode No
Hearing Aid Compatible No
TTY/TDD No
Noise Cancellation No
SAR Head: 0.9 W/kg
Languages No
Manufacturer Warranty -
Accessories Included AC Charger, Data Cable, Headset, Manual, Standard Battery
Power & battery
Type Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion)
Battery Capacity No
Removable Battery Yes
Wireless Charging No
Fast Charging No
Video Playback Time Unknown
Internet Use (Wi-Fi) Unknown
Internet Use (Celluar) Unknown
Talk Time Unknown
Standby Time Up to: 9.5 days
Physical Characteristics
Design type Slider
Colors Lilac purple, Silver with black or red accents
Dimensions [H x W x D] 9.2 x 4.8 x 2.1 cm (3.6 x 1.9 x 0.8 in)
Weight 107 grams
Water Resistant / Waterproof Unknown
Rugged design No
IP Rating No
Antenna Type Internal
Changeable Faceplates No
Display / Screen
Type Color
Technology LCD (TFT)
Colors 262k
Resolution 320 x 240 pixels
Pixel density Unknown
Size Unknown
3D No
Secondary Display No
Graphics Yes
Themes No
Backlit Illumination Yes
Zoom / Magnification No
Screen Orientation Lock No
Multi-Touch No
Fingerprint-Resistant Coating No
Additional Display Features -
Input / Navigation
Sleep / Wake Key No
Home Key No
Mute Key No
Input Type Standard / 12-key Numeric
Navigation Type D-pad
Predictive Text Entry T9
Physical keyboard No
Voicemail Key Yes
Any Key Answer Yes
Voice Commands Yes
Keypad/Screen Lock Yes
External Volume Control Yes
External Media Playback Controls No
Fingerprint Sensor No
Call Management
Wi-Fi Calling No
Voice over LTE (VoLTE) No
Contact List Capacity 500
Multiple Numbers Per Contact Unknown
Contact Groups No
Auto Answer No
Voice Activated Dialing Yes
Photo Caller ID Yes
Web / Email / Messaging
Web Browser Yes
Email Client Yes
Email Protocols POP3, IMAP, SMTP
Additional Email Features -
Messaging SMS, EMS, MMS, AIM, ICQ
Push-to-talk (PTT) No
Connectivity
USB Yes
USB OTG Support No
Infrared Yes
Bluetooth Yes
Bluetooth Profiles No
Bluetooth Audio Codecs SBC
WiFi No
Mobile Hotspot No
WiMAX No
Memory Expansion Slot Yes
Expansion Slot Info MiniSD (up to 2 GB)
PC Synchronization Yes
TV Out Unknown
DLNA Support No
NFC No
UMA Support No
Data Tethering Compatibility Yes
Java Applications Yes
Brew Applications No
ECML / Digital Wallet No
PictBridge No
Camera
Main Camera
Aperture
Unknown
Resolution
1+ megapixels
Dual lens
No
Zoom
8x digital
Flash
-
Additional Rear Camera Info
Self-timer
Video Recording Formats
3GP / 3GPP
Video Recording Parameters
QCIF (176 x 144 pixels), 15 fps
Front Camera
Zoom
No
Additional Front Camera Info
No
Video Recording Parameters
Audio / Video
Audio Playback Yes
Audio Formats MIDI, MP3, eAAC+, AAC+, AAC, WMA
Radio Yes
Video Playback Yes
Video Playback Formats 3GP / 3GPP
Mobile TV No
Streaming Video No
Headset Jack 2.5mm
Custom Ringtones No
Vibration Alert Yes
Downloadable Ringtones Yes
Ringtone Composer No
Ringer ID Yes
Haptic Feedback Vibration No
Speakerphone Yes
Apps
To-Do / Task List Yes
Calendar Yes
World Clock No
Alarm Yes
Stop Watch Yes
Timer No
Calculator Yes
Currency Converter Yes
Viewable document types No
Weather No
Stocks No
Maps No
NotePad Yes
Voice Memos / Recorder Yes
Games Downloadable
Apps
Included Software / Apps -
More
Additional comments Outside of North America, the Nokia 5300 features the GSM 900 frequency instead of GSM 850MHz.
Related Links Manual (PDF)
Nokia 5300 XpressMusic Reviews
Where to buy Nokia 5300 XpressMusic
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Critic Reviews


Phonedog

Nokia 5300 Red | Review

from Phonedog

Introduction & Design

Introduction

Nokia has been pushing their high-end N-Series "multimedia computer" handsets in the United States over the past year, going so far as to open flagship stores in New York and Chicago where consumers can purchase the devices unlocked for use on T-Mobile, Cingular, and other GSM networks.  The Finnish cellular giant's business devices have also been gaining a little traction here in the states, with the E62 holding a place down in Cingular's smartphone lineup.  Now Nokia looks to the mid-range customer with the arrival of the 5300 XpressMusic on T-Mobile.    A music-centric slider featuring a 1.3 megapixel camera, stereo Bluetooth, and a T-Mobile branded version of the Series 40 interface, the 5300 competes against other mid-range musicphones like Sony Ericsson's w810i (Cingular) and the LG Fusic (Sprint).  The 5300 offers a sporty (if somewhat chunky) design, a degree of customization not usually found in mid-range carrier-supported phones, and an included 1 GB memory card to load up with music from your digital collection.  While the 5300 isn't for power users, it is a solid choice if you're looking for a quality music phone that won't break your budget.  And I was honestly surprised at how many people who saw my review model commented on how cool they thought it looked.
 

Design

Nokia isn't known for making ultra-thin, ultra-chic handsets, and while they clearly put some thought into designing the 5300, nobody's going to mistake it for a RAZR.  Instead, the 5300 has a sporty look: The phone Nokia sent me was finished in white with black and silver trim, and featured rubberized side panels for easier gripping.  It's an attractive device and its beautiful front-mounted display adds to its good looks.  At 92 x 48 x 21 mm, the 5300 has a small footprint but is rather thick; as such it's a little bulkier in a pants or jacket pocket than its competitors.  Still, everywhere I took the phone people commented on how hip it looked.  

The front panel of the handset is largely given over to a 2" LCD display.  Black rubberized plastic forms a border around the display, while the rest of the phone's front is framed in a glossy white plastic.  To the left of the screen, three small buttons raise up from under the rubber - these are the 5300's dedicated music controls (Play/Pause, Track Advance, Track Rewind), and they're labeled in white.  A white Nokia logo graces the black border on the opposite side of the display. 
All edges of the phone are rounded off, giving the 5300 a fun, youthful look.  Above and below the display, silver plastic insets house the earpiece (top) and navigational buttons and microphone (bottom).  The navigational array is made up of a four-way directional pad with center OK button that's flanked by four additional unlabeled, color-coded buttons: two softkeys and dedicated Call/Hang Up keys.  It's funny, with all of these buttons you might think the 5300 would look rather busy from the front; instead, it's got something of a Zen quality to it.  The white/black/silver color scheme and four subtly colored buttons make the handset look something like a small spaceship from a planet inhabited by young, style-conscious gadget heads with a sense of whimsy about them.

Sliding the front panel up is made easier by a raised thumb ridge along the display's lower edge, and an internal spring-assist mechanism.  The sliding movement ends with a satisfying click.  The dialing keypad revealed beneath is finished in matte silver with grey labels that glow a cool blue when the backlight is activated.  In fact, the entire "middle layer" of the handset is finished in silver, including a cool metal plate with reflective Nokia logo that's only visible from behind when the phone is in the open position (it's the back of the phone's front panel, if that makes sense).  Again, the effect is "Spaceship from Planet Fun."  The 12-button dialing keypad is easy to use, with raised soft-touch keys that provide good tactile feedback during dialing.
The left panel of the phone houses the aforementioned music player buttons as well as the 2.5mm headphone jack.  On the right we find three more small, raised buttons for Camera access and volume Up/Down along with an infrared sensor.  Additionally, a lanyard clip is housed in the top left corner of the phone.  A power button, mini-USB port and AC adapter jack grace the top of the 5300, while the bottom panel is devoid of any buttons or ports.

The back portion of the phone is finished in white with a wide black rubberized stripe that wraps around from the sides.  Above the stripe lies the camera sensor and a self-potrait mirror, while a speaker grille andT-Mobile's "MyFaves" logo are found below.  Nokia added one more of their logos, finished white, in the middle of the black band.

Features

Features

Music is the main draw of the 5300.  Nokia's music player arranges your tracks in iPod-like fashion, letting you browse according to Artists, Albums, Genres, Composers, and user-deinfed playlists.  Songs can be loaded direct from a computer via USB or bluetooth, or using the included mini-USB cable. T-Mobile included Nokia's music management program on CD with the phone, though I found it just as easy to manually drag tracks to the memory card or device in USB Mass Storage mode.  Music can be played back over the integrated speaker or via wired or wireless (Bluetooth) headphones.  The Series 40 operating system allows for background playing of music during other tasks, and tracks can be controlled using either the dedicated music keys or the D-pad. 

T-Mobile does not yet have a 3G network, so no streaming music or entertainment options are supported by the 5300, though an integrated radio picks up FM signals using a connected headphone cable as an antenna.  Video playback is available, but only the 3GP format is supported.  The phone also came with two games preinstalled, and more are available for purchase from T-Mobile.  Unfortunately, T-Mobile has closed the operating system to block installation of unsupported third-party apps; for instance, while I was able to download Opera Mini via the T-Zones WAP browser, I was unable to actually install and run it. 

The 5300 features a standard suite of PIM applications including a contacts manager with photo, video and ringtone caller ID, an organizer with calendar, appointment and to-do alarms,  alarm clock,  notepad, countdown timer, and stopwatch.  Perhaps the "hidden gem" of this handset is the Active Standby feature which allows for a Windows Mobile-esque home screen customizable with application shortcuts, notes, and calendar reminders.  I tend to rely on my phone's calendar reminders on a daily basis, so I really appreciated Active Standby - having my daily schedule accessible from the home screen gave the 5300 something of a "smartphone in a regular phone's clothes" feel. 

As a side note to fellow Mac users out there, while the 5300 is not officially supported by iSync on OS X, I was able to find a very easy hack online that made my MacBook recognize the phone.  After just a few minutes I was wirelessly syncing my calendar and contact entries via Bluetooth.  

MyFaves is also supported on the 5300.  MyFaves is a T-Mobile calling plan that allows for unlimited calls to and from five phone numbers that you pre-select.  The numbers can be on any mobile or landline network in the United States, and each number may be changed once per calendar month.  MyFaves compatible handsets support one-touch dialing and messaging to your five "faves."

Camera


Nokia built a pretty average 1.3 megapixel camera into the 5300.  The camera performs well in daylight and other well-lit conditions, and photos taken with the phone render wonderfully on its 262,000 color QVGA display.  However, as with most cameraphones, picture quality suffers noticeably on shots taken in low-light conditions, including most nighttime and dimly lit indoor scenes.  So you might have problems using your hip, young cameraphone inside of those hip, young, and dark nightclubs.  The upside is Nokia's software makes it easy to use your photos as wallpapers and caller ID photos, attach them to MMS messages, or transfer them to a computer via Bluetooth, Infrared, USB, or "sneakernet" by way of the included microSD memory card. 

...

More
Introduction & DesignIntroduction
Nokia has been pushing their high-end N-Series "multimedia computer" handsets in the United States over the past year, going so far as to open flagship stores in New York and Chicago where consumers can purchase the devices unlocked for use on T-Mobile, Cingular, and other GSM networks.  The Finnish cellular giant's business devices have also been gaining a little traction here in the states, with the E62 holding a place down in Cingular's smartphone lineup.  Now Nokia looks to the mid-range customer with the arrival of the 5300 XpressMusic on T-Mobile.    A music-centric slider featuring a 1.3 megapixel camera, stereo Bluetooth, and a T-Mobile branded version of the Series 40 interface, the 5300 competes against other mid-range musicphones like Sony Ericsson's w810i (Cingular) and the LG Fusic (Sprint).  The 5300 offers a sporty (if somewhat chunky) design, a degree of customization not usually found in mid-range carrier-supported phones, and an included 1 GB memory card to load up with music from your digital collection.  While the 5300 isn't for power users, it is a solid choice if you're looking for a quality music phone that won't break your budget.  And I was honestly surprised at how many people who saw my review model commented on how cool they thought it looked.
 
Design
Nokia isn't known for making ultra-thin, ultra-chic handsets, and while they clearly put some thought into designing the 5300, nobody's going to mistake it for a RAZR.  Instead, the 5300 has a sporty look: The phone Nokia sent me was finished in white with black and silver trim, and featured rubberized side panels for easier gripping.  It's an attractive device and its beautiful front-mounted display adds to its good looks.  At 92 x 48 x 21 mm, the 5300 has a small footprint but is rather thick; as such it's a little bulkier in a pants or jacket pocket than its competitors.  Still, everywhere I took the phone people commented on how hip it looked.  

The front panel of the handset is largely given over to a 2" LCD display.  Black rubberized plastic forms a border around the display, while the rest of the phone's front is framed in a glossy white plastic.  To the left of the screen, three small buttons raise up from under the rubber - these are the 5300's dedicated music controls (Play/Pause, Track Advance, Track Rewind), and they're labeled in white.  A white Nokia logo graces the black border on the opposite side of the display. 
All edges of the phone are rounded off, giving the 5300 a fun, youthful look.  Above and below the display, silver plastic insets house the earpiece (top) and navigational buttons and microphone (bottom).  The navigational array is made up of a four-way directional pad with center OK button that's flanked by four additional unlabeled, color-coded buttons: two softkeys and dedicated Call/Hang Up keys.  It's funny, with all of these buttons you might think the 5300 would look rather busy from the front; instead, it's got something of a Zen quality to it.  The white/black/silver color scheme and four subtly colored buttons make the handset look something like a small spaceship from a planet inhabited by young, style-conscious gadget heads with a sense of whimsy about them.

Sliding the front panel up is made easier by a raised thumb ridge along the display's lower edge, and an internal spring-assist mechanism.  The sliding movement ends with a satisfying click.  The dialing keypad revealed beneath is finished in matte silver with grey labels that glow a cool blue when the backlight is activated.  In fact, the entire "middle layer" of the handset is finished in silver, including a cool metal plate with reflective Nokia logo that's only visible from behind when the phone is in the open position (it's the back of the phone's front panel, if that makes sense).  Again, the effect is "Spaceship from Planet Fun."  The 12-button dialing keypad is easy to use, with raised soft-touch keys that provide good tactile feedback during dialing.
The left panel of the phone houses the aforementioned music player buttons as well as the 2.5mm headphone jack.  On the right we find three more small, raised buttons for Camera access and volume Up/Down along with an infrared sensor.  Additionally, a lanyard clip is housed in the top left corner of the phone.  A power button, mini-USB port and AC adapter jack grace the top of the 5300, while the bottom panel is devoid of any buttons or ports.

The back portion of the phone is finished in white with a wide black rubberized stripe that wraps around from the sides.  Above the stripe lies the camera sensor and a self-potrait mirror, while a speaker grille andT-Mobile's "MyFaves" logo are found below.  Nokia added one more of their logos, finished white, in the middle of the black band. FeaturesFeatures
Music is the main draw of the 5300.  Nokia's music player arranges your tracks in iPod-like fashion, letting you browse according to Artists, Albums, Genres, Composers, and user-deinfed playlists.  Songs can be loaded direct from a computer via USB or bluetooth, or using the included mini-USB cable. T-Mobile included Nokia's music management program on CD with the phone, though I found it just as easy to manually drag tracks to the memory card or device in USB Mass Storage mode.  Music can be played back over the integrated speaker or via wired or wireless (Bluetooth) headphones.  The Series 40 operating system allows for background playing of music during other tasks, and tracks can be controlled using either the dedicated music keys or the D-pad. 

T-Mobile does not yet have a 3G network, so no streaming music or entertainment options are supported by the 5300, though an integrated radio picks up FM signals using a connected headphone cable as an antenna.  Video playback is available, but only the 3GP format is supported.  The phone also came with two games preinstalled, and more are available for purchase from T-Mobile.  Unfortunately, T-Mobile has closed the operating system to block installation of unsupported third-party apps; for instance, while I was able to download Opera Mini via the T-Zones WAP browser, I was unable to actually install and run it. 

The 5300 features a standard suite of PIM applications including a contacts manager with photo, video and ringtone caller ID, an organizer with calendar, appointment and to-do alarms,  alarm clock,  notepad, countdown timer, and stopwatch.  Perhaps the "hidden gem" of this handset is the Active Standby feature which allows for a Windows Mobile-esque home screen customizable with application shortcuts, notes, and calendar reminders.  I tend to rely on my phone's calendar reminders on a daily basis, so I really appreciated Active Standby - having my daily schedule accessible from the home screen gave the 5300 something of a "smartphone in a regular phone's clothes" feel. 

As a side note to fellow Mac users out there, while the 5300 is not officially supported by iSync on OS X, I was able to find a very easy hack online that made my MacBook recognize the phone.  After just a few minutes I was wirelessly syncing my calendar and contact entries via Bluetooth.  

MyFaves is also supported on the 5300.  MyFaves is a T-Mobile calling plan that allows for unlimited calls to and from five phone numbers that you pre-select.  The numbers can be on any mobile or landline network in the United States, and each number may be changed once per calendar month.  MyFaves compatible handsets support one-touch dialing and messaging to your five "faves."

Camera
Nokia built a pretty average 1.3 megapixel camera into the 5300.  The camera performs well in daylight and other well-lit conditions, and photos taken with the phone render wonderfully on its 262,000 color QVGA display.  However, as with most cameraphones, picture quality suffers noticeably on shots taken in low-light conditions, including most nighttime and dimly lit indoor scenes.  So you might have problems using your hip, young cameraphone inside of those hip, young, and dark nightclubs.  The upside is Nokia's software makes it easy to use your photos as wallpapers and caller ID photos, attach them to MMS messages, or transfer them to a computer via Bluetooth, Infrared, USB, or "sneakernet" by way of the included microSD memory card. 

The camcorder can shoot video with sound at 176x144 or 129 x 96 resolution.   Clips can go as long as you want, provided you have sufficient memory available in the phone or on a memory card; beware, though, as the default mode limits videos to just six seconds of recording time.  Cameraphone videos taken with the 5300 weren't all that great - just a bit below average for a mid-range cameraphone.

Display & AudioDisplay
Nokia built the 5300 with a gorgeous 2" QVGA (320 x 240) display that supports 262,144 colors.  The display actually looks a bit larger than it is thanks to the handset's compact body and the black border that frames the screen.  In any event, colors display richly and vividly on the display, and text, photos, graphics, and videos were all easy to see.  I took a few outdoor shots with the phone's camera and set one as my wallpaper, and honestly marvel at how great it looks on that screen. 

As mentioned, the Active Standby mode on the 5300's Series 40 OS allows for a great deal of home screen customization.  WIth a few clicks I set my phone up to display a horizontal shortcuts bar, text and icon links to the music player and radio, and a shortcut to today's entry on the calendar along with all of today's appointments.  Oh, and beneath that, I also have a customizable note (text and icons).  Again, the 5300 isn't a smartphone but it does offer quite a bit more power and flexibility than the average handset when it comes to customization. 

The 5300 also features a power save mode that dims the display after a period of inactivity, leaving only the time and date displayed in black at a very low brightness setting.  Optional animations can also be set to run when the phone is slid open and shut.

Audio
I tested the tri-band GSM 5300 on T-Mobile's network in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Voice quality through the internal earpiece was generally excellent.  I almost always captured a strong signal, and voices were almost always clear and loud on both ends of the conversation. The speakerphone worked well, though voice dialing is not supported by the 5300..  While I don't expect much from music playback through a cellphone's built-in speaker, the Nokia's speaker had plenty of volume for impromptu group listening sessions.

A stereo headset is included with the 5300, as is a 2.5 to 3.5mm stereo adapter.  The headset is of standard "included earphones" quality, which is to say that if you listen to a lot of music you're not going to want to use it for very long.  I used the 3.5mm adapter to connect my Ultimate Ears earphones to the 5300, and also to connect it to my car stereo system.  The UE earphones are ... well, they're pretty awesome ... and they uncovered a fair amount of background hiss coming from the phone during music playback.  Generally speaking, however, the hiss was only noticeable between songs or during very quiet passages.  And I didn't really notice the hiss at all when the phone was playing music back over the car stereo.

I should also mention that any phone marketed as a "music phone" should really have a 3.5mm headphone jack built-in.  The 5300's adapter works, but it's both cumbersome and easy to lose.  Nokia's N76 has a 3.5mm jack, so it's not like they don't know how to build one into a handset. That being said, I'd rate the 5300's audio quality for music playback somewhere just below that of an iPod or a Sony Ericsson Walkman phone: It's really very good, but not quite on par with the best in the business.  Nokia's built-in graphic equalizer is great for tailoring the sound to your own tastes, and it features several factory presets and two more that you can customize to your own liking.   Bluetooth audio devices are also supported, including stereo over Bluetooth.  I had no trouble pairing a Bluetooth earpiece with the phone, and voice quality with the earpiece was good.  Stereo music over Bluetooth also sounded quite good.

Messaging, Internet & ConnectivityMessaging
Messaging on the 5300 includes SMS and MMS as well as IM support for AOL, ICQ, Windows Messenger, and Yahoo!; Email is not supported by a dedicated client, though T-Mobile's T-Zones service does provide a very rudimentary email service accessible via WAP browser.  As such, the 5300 is just fine for occasional messaging, but certainly not the device for anyone who needs mobile Email on a regular basis.  Text entry is made easier by Nokia's predictive text input system, which I found to work pretty well.  Photos and Videos can be attached to MMS messages with relative ease, as can short audio clips.  Message composition was a snap on the handset's rich, clear display.

Internet
Mobile Internet access is T-Mobile's glaring weak spot right now, and it's not a strong suit of the 5300, either.  Data rates are limited by the carrier's EDGE network (3G is coming from T-Mobile, but it ain't here yet), and your browsing experience is limited by the handset's WAP-only browser.  T-Mobile's optional $5.99/month T-MobileWeb plan brings News, Weather, Sports, and Entertainment updates to the phone, as well as clunky Email access. As previously mentioned, T-Mobile has blocked the installation of unauthorized applications on the 5300.  Consequently, I was unable to install the Opera Mini browser on the phone (even though I was able to download it from Opera's WAP site).

Connectivity
A tri-band GSM phone, Sync supports the 850/1800/1900 bands as well as EDGE data transfer.  The phone is locked and so may only be used on T-Mobile's wireless network. Bluetooth is supported on the 5300, including file transfer and contact/calendar sync with a PC.  The phone also paired easily with mono and stereo Bluetooth headsets and worked well for voice calling and stereo music playback. The 5300 also features a microSD slot for expansion via removable memory cards.  A 1gb microSD card is included in the retail package.  Note that the microSD slot is "hidden" beneath the rear panel of the phone, making it difficult (if not impossible) to swap memory cards without turning the phone off.
ConclusionConclusion
I've always been a fan of Nokia handsets.  They're generally built to high standards and feature attractive, logical menu systems, and solid features, even if they're a little less trendy than their competitors when it comes to style.  The new Nokia 5300 XpressMusic for T-Mobile brings a little bit of flair to the Finnish phone maker's sturdy style, combining a sporty color scheme with rounded edges, external media controls, and an easy-grip rubberized exterior.  The result is a handset that's both compact and thick, with a pleasant heft and snappy slider mechanism. 

Though it's not quite up to the standard set by Sony Ericsson's Walkman phones (or some of Nokia's own N-Series devices), the 5300's music player is elegant, intuitive, and turns out good sounding music to all but the most discerning of ears.  When you take the included 1GB memory card and benefits of Active Standby on the Series 40 interface into consideration, the 5300 really represents a sweet spot in T-Mobile's lineup.  It's a quality handset with excellent music player and PIM features at a price much lower than a smartphone.  If you're looking to combine your music player with your phone and like the 5300's "fun spaceship" look, it's definitely worth a look.  And a listen.
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Phonedog

Nokia 5300 Lilac | Review

from Phonedog

Introduction & Design

Introduction

Nokia has been pushing their high-end N-Series "multimedia computer" handsets in the United States over the past year, going so far as to open flagship stores in New York and Chicago where consumers can purchase the devices unlocked for use on T-Mobile, Cingular, and other GSM networks.  The Finnish cellular giant's business devices have also been gaining a little traction here in the states, with the E62 holding a place down in Cingular's smartphone lineup.  Now Nokia looks to the mid-range customer with the arrival of the 5300 XpressMusic on T-Mobile.    A music-centric slider featuring a 1.3 megapixel camera, stereo Bluetooth, and a T-Mobile branded version of the Series 40 interface, the 5300 competes against other mid-range musicphones like Sony Ericsson's w810i (Cingular) and the LG Fusic (Sprint).  The 5300 offers a sporty (if somewhat chunky) design, a degree of customization not usually found in mid-range carrier-supported phones, and an included 1 GB memory card to load up with music from your digital collection.  While the 5300 isn't for power users, it is a solid choice if you're looking for a quality music phone that won't break your budget.  And I was honestly surprised at how many people who saw my review model commented on how cool they thought it looked.
 

Design

Nokia isn't known for making ultra-thin, ultra-chic handsets, and while they clearly put some thought into designing the 5300, nobody's going to mistake it for a RAZR.  Instead, the 5300 has a sporty look: The phone Nokia sent me was finished in white with black and silver trim, and featured rubberized side panels for easier gripping.  It's an attractive device and its beautiful front-mounted display adds to its good looks.  At 92 x 48 x 21 mm, the 5300 has a small footprint but is rather thick; as such it's a little bulkier in a pants or jacket pocket than its competitors.  Still, everywhere I took the phone people commented on how hip it looked.  

The front panel of the handset is largely given over to a 2" LCD display.  Black rubberized plastic forms a border around the display, while the rest of the phone's front is framed in a glossy white plastic.  To the left of the screen, three small buttons raise up from under the rubber - these are the 5300's dedicated music controls (Play/Pause, Track Advance, Track Rewind), and they're labeled in white.  A white Nokia logo graces the black border on the opposite side of the display. 
All edges of the phone are rounded off, giving the 5300 a fun, youthful look.  Above and below the display, silver plastic insets house the earpiece (top) and navigational buttons and microphone (bottom).  The navigational array is made up of a four-way directional pad with center OK button that's flanked by four additional unlabeled, color-coded buttons: two softkeys and dedicated Call/Hang Up keys.  It's funny, with all of these buttons you might think the 5300 would look rather busy from the front; instead, it's got something of a Zen quality to it.  The white/black/silver color scheme and four subtly colored buttons make the handset look something like a small spaceship from a planet inhabited by young, style-conscious gadget heads with a sense of whimsy about them.

Sliding the front panel up is made easier by a raised thumb ridge along the display's lower edge, and an internal spring-assist mechanism.  The sliding movement ends with a satisfying click.  The dialing keypad revealed beneath is finished in matte silver with grey labels that glow a cool blue when the backlight is activated.  In fact, the entire "middle layer" of the handset is finished in silver, including a cool metal plate with reflective Nokia logo that's only visible from behind when the phone is in the open position (it's the back of the phone's front panel, if that makes sense).  Again, the effect is "Spaceship from Planet Fun."  The 12-button dialing keypad is easy to use, with raised soft-touch keys that provide good tactile feedback during dialing.
The left panel of the phone houses the aforementioned music player buttons as well as the 2.5mm headphone jack.  On the right we find three more small, raised buttons for Camera access and volume Up/Down along with an infrared sensor.  Additionally, a lanyard clip is housed in the top left corner of the phone.  A power button, mini-USB port and AC adapter jack grace the top of the 5300, while the bottom panel is devoid of any buttons or ports.

The back portion of the phone is finished in white with a wide black rubberized stripe that wraps around from the sides.  Above the stripe lies the camera sensor and a self-potrait mirror, while a speaker grille andT-Mobile's "MyFaves" logo are found below.  Nokia added one more of their logos, finished white, in the middle of the black band.

Features

Features

Music is the main draw of the 5300.  Nokia's music player arranges your tracks in iPod-like fashion, letting you browse according to Artists, Albums, Genres, Composers, and user-deinfed playlists.  Songs can be loaded direct from a computer via USB or bluetooth, or using the included mini-USB cable. T-Mobile included Nokia's music management program on CD with the phone, though I found it just as easy to manually drag tracks to the memory card or device in USB Mass Storage mode.  Music can be played back over the integrated speaker or via wired or wireless (Bluetooth) headphones.  The Series 40 operating system allows for background playing of music during other tasks, and tracks can be controlled using either the dedicated music keys or the D-pad. 

T-Mobile does not yet have a 3G network, so no streaming music or entertainment options are supported by the 5300, though an integrated radio picks up FM signals using a connected headphone cable as an antenna.  Video playback is available, but only the 3GP format is supported.  The phone also came with two games preinstalled, and more are available for purchase from T-Mobile.  Unfortunately, T-Mobile has closed the operating system to block installation of unsupported third-party apps; for instance, while I was able to download Opera Mini via the T-Zones WAP browser, I was unable to actually install and run it. 

The 5300 features a standard suite of PIM applications including a contacts manager with photo, video and ringtone caller ID, an organizer with calendar, appointment and to-do alarms,  alarm clock,  notepad, countdown timer, and stopwatch.  Perhaps the "hidden gem" of this handset is the Active Standby feature which allows for a Windows Mobile-esque home screen customizable with application shortcuts, notes, and calendar reminders.  I tend to rely on my phone's calendar reminders on a daily basis, so I really appreciated Active Standby - having my daily schedule accessible from the home screen gave the 5300 something of a "smartphone in a regular phone's clothes" feel. 

As a side note to fellow Mac users out there, while the 5300 is not officially supported by iSync on OS X, I was able to find a very easy hack online that made my MacBook recognize the phone.  After just a few minutes I was wirelessly syncing my calendar and contact entries via Bluetooth.  

MyFaves is also supported on the 5300.  MyFaves is a T-Mobile calling plan that allows for unlimited calls to and from five phone numbers that you pre-select.  The numbers can be on any mobile or landline network in the United States, and each number may be changed once per calendar month.  MyFaves compatible handsets support one-touch dialing and messaging to your five "faves."

Camera


Nokia built a pretty average 1.3 megapixel camera into the 5300.  The camera performs well in daylight and other well-lit conditions, and photos taken with the phone render wonderfully on its 262,000 color QVGA display.  However, as with most cameraphones, picture quality suffers noticeably on shots taken in low-light conditions, including most nighttime and dimly lit indoor scenes.  So you might have problems using your hip, young cameraphone inside of those hip, young, and dark nightclubs.  The upside is Nokia's software makes it easy to use your photos as wallpapers and caller ID photos, attach them to MMS messages, or transfer them to a computer via Bluetooth, Infrared, USB, or "sneakernet" by way of the included microSD memory card. 

...

More
Introduction & DesignIntroduction
Nokia has been pushing their high-end N-Series "multimedia computer" handsets in the United States over the past year, going so far as to open flagship stores in New York and Chicago where consumers can purchase the devices unlocked for use on T-Mobile, Cingular, and other GSM networks.  The Finnish cellular giant's business devices have also been gaining a little traction here in the states, with the E62 holding a place down in Cingular's smartphone lineup.  Now Nokia looks to the mid-range customer with the arrival of the 5300 XpressMusic on T-Mobile.    A music-centric slider featuring a 1.3 megapixel camera, stereo Bluetooth, and a T-Mobile branded version of the Series 40 interface, the 5300 competes against other mid-range musicphones like Sony Ericsson's w810i (Cingular) and the LG Fusic (Sprint).  The 5300 offers a sporty (if somewhat chunky) design, a degree of customization not usually found in mid-range carrier-supported phones, and an included 1 GB memory card to load up with music from your digital collection.  While the 5300 isn't for power users, it is a solid choice if you're looking for a quality music phone that won't break your budget.  And I was honestly surprised at how many people who saw my review model commented on how cool they thought it looked.
 
Design
Nokia isn't known for making ultra-thin, ultra-chic handsets, and while they clearly put some thought into designing the 5300, nobody's going to mistake it for a RAZR.  Instead, the 5300 has a sporty look: The phone Nokia sent me was finished in white with black and silver trim, and featured rubberized side panels for easier gripping.  It's an attractive device and its beautiful front-mounted display adds to its good looks.  At 92 x 48 x 21 mm, the 5300 has a small footprint but is rather thick; as such it's a little bulkier in a pants or jacket pocket than its competitors.  Still, everywhere I took the phone people commented on how hip it looked.  

The front panel of the handset is largely given over to a 2" LCD display.  Black rubberized plastic forms a border around the display, while the rest of the phone's front is framed in a glossy white plastic.  To the left of the screen, three small buttons raise up from under the rubber - these are the 5300's dedicated music controls (Play/Pause, Track Advance, Track Rewind), and they're labeled in white.  A white Nokia logo graces the black border on the opposite side of the display. 
All edges of the phone are rounded off, giving the 5300 a fun, youthful look.  Above and below the display, silver plastic insets house the earpiece (top) and navigational buttons and microphone (bottom).  The navigational array is made up of a four-way directional pad with center OK button that's flanked by four additional unlabeled, color-coded buttons: two softkeys and dedicated Call/Hang Up keys.  It's funny, with all of these buttons you might think the 5300 would look rather busy from the front; instead, it's got something of a Zen quality to it.  The white/black/silver color scheme and four subtly colored buttons make the handset look something like a small spaceship from a planet inhabited by young, style-conscious gadget heads with a sense of whimsy about them.

Sliding the front panel up is made easier by a raised thumb ridge along the display's lower edge, and an internal spring-assist mechanism.  The sliding movement ends with a satisfying click.  The dialing keypad revealed beneath is finished in matte silver with grey labels that glow a cool blue when the backlight is activated.  In fact, the entire "middle layer" of the handset is finished in silver, including a cool metal plate with reflective Nokia logo that's only visible from behind when the phone is in the open position (it's the back of the phone's front panel, if that makes sense).  Again, the effect is "Spaceship from Planet Fun."  The 12-button dialing keypad is easy to use, with raised soft-touch keys that provide good tactile feedback during dialing.
The left panel of the phone houses the aforementioned music player buttons as well as the 2.5mm headphone jack.  On the right we find three more small, raised buttons for Camera access and volume Up/Down along with an infrared sensor.  Additionally, a lanyard clip is housed in the top left corner of the phone.  A power button, mini-USB port and AC adapter jack grace the top of the 5300, while the bottom panel is devoid of any buttons or ports.

The back portion of the phone is finished in white with a wide black rubberized stripe that wraps around from the sides.  Above the stripe lies the camera sensor and a self-potrait mirror, while a speaker grille andT-Mobile's "MyFaves" logo are found below.  Nokia added one more of their logos, finished white, in the middle of the black band. FeaturesFeatures
Music is the main draw of the 5300.  Nokia's music player arranges your tracks in iPod-like fashion, letting you browse according to Artists, Albums, Genres, Composers, and user-deinfed playlists.  Songs can be loaded direct from a computer via USB or bluetooth, or using the included mini-USB cable. T-Mobile included Nokia's music management program on CD with the phone, though I found it just as easy to manually drag tracks to the memory card or device in USB Mass Storage mode.  Music can be played back over the integrated speaker or via wired or wireless (Bluetooth) headphones.  The Series 40 operating system allows for background playing of music during other tasks, and tracks can be controlled using either the dedicated music keys or the D-pad. 

T-Mobile does not yet have a 3G network, so no streaming music or entertainment options are supported by the 5300, though an integrated radio picks up FM signals using a connected headphone cable as an antenna.  Video playback is available, but only the 3GP format is supported.  The phone also came with two games preinstalled, and more are available for purchase from T-Mobile.  Unfortunately, T-Mobile has closed the operating system to block installation of unsupported third-party apps; for instance, while I was able to download Opera Mini via the T-Zones WAP browser, I was unable to actually install and run it. 

The 5300 features a standard suite of PIM applications including a contacts manager with photo, video and ringtone caller ID, an organizer with calendar, appointment and to-do alarms,  alarm clock,  notepad, countdown timer, and stopwatch.  Perhaps the "hidden gem" of this handset is the Active Standby feature which allows for a Windows Mobile-esque home screen customizable with application shortcuts, notes, and calendar reminders.  I tend to rely on my phone's calendar reminders on a daily basis, so I really appreciated Active Standby - having my daily schedule accessible from the home screen gave the 5300 something of a "smartphone in a regular phone's clothes" feel. 

As a side note to fellow Mac users out there, while the 5300 is not officially supported by iSync on OS X, I was able to find a very easy hack online that made my MacBook recognize the phone.  After just a few minutes I was wirelessly syncing my calendar and contact entries via Bluetooth.  

MyFaves is also supported on the 5300.  MyFaves is a T-Mobile calling plan that allows for unlimited calls to and from five phone numbers that you pre-select.  The numbers can be on any mobile or landline network in the United States, and each number may be changed once per calendar month.  MyFaves compatible handsets support one-touch dialing and messaging to your five "faves."

Camera
Nokia built a pretty average 1.3 megapixel camera into the 5300.  The camera performs well in daylight and other well-lit conditions, and photos taken with the phone render wonderfully on its 262,000 color QVGA display.  However, as with most cameraphones, picture quality suffers noticeably on shots taken in low-light conditions, including most nighttime and dimly lit indoor scenes.  So you might have problems using your hip, young cameraphone inside of those hip, young, and dark nightclubs.  The upside is Nokia's software makes it easy to use your photos as wallpapers and caller ID photos, attach them to MMS messages, or transfer them to a computer via Bluetooth, Infrared, USB, or "sneakernet" by way of the included microSD memory card. 

The camcorder can shoot video with sound at 176x144 or 129 x 96 resolution.   Clips can go as long as you want, provided you have sufficient memory available in the phone or on a memory card; beware, though, as the default mode limits videos to just six seconds of recording time.  Cameraphone videos taken with the 5300 weren't all that great - just a bit below average for a mid-range cameraphone.

Display & AudioDisplay
Nokia built the 5300 with a gorgeous 2" QVGA (320 x 240) display that supports 262,144 colors.  The display actually looks a bit larger than it is thanks to the handset's compact body and the black border that frames the screen.  In any event, colors display richly and vividly on the display, and text, photos, graphics, and videos were all easy to see.  I took a few outdoor shots with the phone's camera and set one as my wallpaper, and honestly marvel at how great it looks on that screen. 

As mentioned, the Active Standby mode on the 5300's Series 40 OS allows for a great deal of home screen customization.  WIth a few clicks I set my phone up to display a horizontal shortcuts bar, text and icon links to the music player and radio, and a shortcut to today's entry on the calendar along with all of today's appointments.  Oh, and beneath that, I also have a customizable note (text and icons).  Again, the 5300 isn't a smartphone but it does offer quite a bit more power and flexibility than the average handset when it comes to customization. 

The 5300 also features a power save mode that dims the display after a period of inactivity, leaving only the time and date displayed in black at a very low brightness setting.  Optional animations can also be set to run when the phone is slid open and shut.

Audio
I tested the tri-band GSM 5300 on T-Mobile's network in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Voice quality through the internal earpiece was generally excellent.  I almost always captured a strong signal, and voices were almost always clear and loud on both ends of the conversation. The speakerphone worked well, though voice dialing is not supported by the 5300..  While I don't expect much from music playback through a cellphone's built-in speaker, the Nokia's speaker had plenty of volume for impromptu group listening sessions.

A stereo headset is included with the 5300, as is a 2.5 to 3.5mm stereo adapter.  The headset is of standard "included earphones" quality, which is to say that if you listen to a lot of music you're not going to want to use it for very long.  I used the 3.5mm adapter to connect my Ultimate Ears earphones to the 5300, and also to connect it to my car stereo system.  The UE earphones are ... well, they're pretty awesome ... and they uncovered a fair amount of background hiss coming from the phone during music playback.  Generally speaking, however, the hiss was only noticeable between songs or during very quiet passages.  And I didn't really notice the hiss at all when the phone was playing music back over the car stereo.

I should also mention that any phone marketed as a "music phone" should really have a 3.5mm headphone jack built-in.  The 5300's adapter works, but it's both cumbersome and easy to lose.  Nokia's N76 has a 3.5mm jack, so it's not like they don't know how to build one into a handset. That being said, I'd rate the 5300's audio quality for music playback somewhere just below that of an iPod or a Sony Ericsson Walkman phone: It's really very good, but not quite on par with the best in the business.  Nokia's built-in graphic equalizer is great for tailoring the sound to your own tastes, and it features several factory presets and two more that you can customize to your own liking.   Bluetooth audio devices are also supported, including stereo over Bluetooth.  I had no trouble pairing a Bluetooth earpiece with the phone, and voice quality with the earpiece was good.  Stereo music over Bluetooth also sounded quite good.

Messaging, Internet & ConnectivityMessaging
Messaging on the 5300 includes SMS and MMS as well as IM support for AOL, ICQ, Windows Messenger, and Yahoo!; Email is not supported by a dedicated client, though T-Mobile's T-Zones service does provide a very rudimentary email service accessible via WAP browser.  As such, the 5300 is just fine for occasional messaging, but certainly not the device for anyone who needs mobile Email on a regular basis.  Text entry is made easier by Nokia's predictive text input system, which I found to work pretty well.  Photos and Videos can be attached to MMS messages with relative ease, as can short audio clips.  Message composition was a snap on the handset's rich, clear display.

Internet
Mobile Internet access is T-Mobile's glaring weak spot right now, and it's not a strong suit of the 5300, either.  Data rates are limited by the carrier's EDGE network (3G is coming from T-Mobile, but it ain't here yet), and your browsing experience is limited by the handset's WAP-only browser.  T-Mobile's optional $5.99/month T-MobileWeb plan brings News, Weather, Sports, and Entertainment updates to the phone, as well as clunky Email access. As previously mentioned, T-Mobile has blocked the installation of unauthorized applications on the 5300.  Consequently, I was unable to install the Opera Mini browser on the phone (even though I was able to download it from Opera's WAP site).

Connectivity
A tri-band GSM phone, Sync supports the 850/1800/1900 bands as well as EDGE data transfer.  The phone is locked and so may only be used on T-Mobile's wireless network. Bluetooth is supported on the 5300, including file transfer and contact/calendar sync with a PC.  The phone also paired easily with mono and stereo Bluetooth headsets and worked well for voice calling and stereo music playback. The 5300 also features a microSD slot for expansion via removable memory cards.  A 1gb microSD card is included in the retail package.  Note that the microSD slot is "hidden" beneath the rear panel of the phone, making it difficult (if not impossible) to swap memory cards without turning the phone off.
ConclusionConclusion
I've always been a fan of Nokia handsets.  They're generally built to high standards and feature attractive, logical menu systems, and solid features, even if they're a little less trendy than their competitors when it comes to style.  The new Nokia 5300 XpressMusic for T-Mobile brings a little bit of flair to the Finnish phone maker's sturdy style, combining a sporty color scheme with rounded edges, external media controls, and an easy-grip rubberized exterior.  The result is a handset that's both compact and thick, with a pleasant heft and snappy slider mechanism. 

Though it's not quite up to the standard set by Sony Ericsson's Walkman phones (or some of Nokia's own N-Series devices), the 5300's music player is elegant, intuitive, and turns out good sounding music to all but the most discerning of ears.  When you take the included 1GB memory card and benefits of Active Standby on the Series 40 interface into consideration, the 5300 really represents a sweet spot in T-Mobile's lineup.  It's a quality handset with excellent music player and PIM features at a price much lower than a smartphone.  If you're looking to combine your music player with your phone and like the 5300's "fun spaceship" look, it's definitely worth a look.  And a listen.
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Wired

Fun design, relatively inexpensive

from Wired

 With zealous Apple followers preparing for the coming iRapture, getting a hold of a cell phone running OSX will be nothing short of a miracle. But for the nonbelievers and those without 500 friggin' dollars to dump on an iPhone, you've got options. If you just want to listen to tunes and make phone calls without all those other superfluous smart phone features, the Nokia 5300 could be your personal (media) savior. This slider has nicely situated external music control keys, and it pauses and resumes audio playback automatically for incoming calls. A loud external speaker and awesome sound quality for both conversation and music make it that much easier to abstain from sinful cell phone splurges...

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 With zealous Apple followers preparing for the coming iRapture, getting a hold of a cell phone running OSX will be nothing short of a miracle. But for the nonbelievers and those without 500 friggin' dollars to dump on an iPhone, you've got options. If you just want to listen to tunes and make phone calls without all those other superfluous smart phone features, the Nokia 5300 could be your personal (media) savior. This slider has nicely situated external music control keys, and it pauses and resumes audio playback automatically for incoming calls. A loud external speaker and awesome sound quality for both conversation and music make it that much easier to abstain from sinful cell phone splurges.

WIRED Fun design. Relatively inexpensive. Large keypad actually compatible with human fingers. Includes 1 GB microSD card. PC and Mac compatible. Can be used as mass storage device. Multiple IM clients. Easy to navigate media player includes customizable equalizer. Includes adapter for 3.5mm headphones. 1.3-megapixel camera with decent picture quality and 8x digital zoom.

TIRED Storage maxes out at 2 GB. Need to remove back panel to access microSD slot. No FM receiver. No album art.

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trustedreviews.com

TrustedReviews: Nokia 5300 XpressMusic Review

trustedreviews.com

Its ergonomics and general ‘usability' are very good, it has a superb screen, is small in the pocket, and I like the slider format a lot. In terms of the latter this handset has probably knocked away the last chink in my ant-slider feelings.

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Its ergonomics and general ‘usability' are very good, it has a superb screen, is small in the pocket, and I like the slider format a lot. In terms of the latter this handset has probably knocked away the last chink in my ant-slider feelings.

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GSMArena

A highly attractive music proposal with a sporty design

At first glance Nokia 5300 failed to impress us with its design and the materials used for its body. In fact we think that the white color and matt plastic with rubber elements make it look cheap. It's not among the slimmest devices either.

But armed with the highly user-configurable S40 user interface it scores even with the corresponding Sony Ericsson user interface and even makes a stride ahead. The menu is organized logically; functions are detailed, offering high control comfort and brilliant work efficiency...

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At first glance Nokia 5300 failed to impress us with its design and the materials used for its body. In fact we think that the white color and matt plastic with rubber elements make it look cheap. It's not among the slimmest devices either.

But armed with the highly user-configurable S40 user interface it scores even with the corresponding Sony Ericsson user interface and even makes a stride ahead. The menu is organized logically; functions are detailed, offering high control comfort and brilliant work efficiency.

Nokia advertisement campaign on the XpressMusic handsets clearly shows that they are made for young people having fun. The available microSD memory card slot, the miniUSB port and the standard 3.5 mm audio jack adapter make it great for enjoying music on the go. You can even fancy a stereo Bluetooth headset to go with it. The slider form factor would most definitely attract attention too, since the Walkman line lacks a slider in this price category. Summing it up, if you like the sporty design, Nokia 5300 is a highly attractive music proposal from the Finnish manufacturer and it definitely deserves your attention when picking up a new mobile this holiday season.

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User Reviews


2 and a half years and still going good!

After my mom bought this for me since March 2008, I've had a ball with it, and abandoned my iPod Nano(dont' get me wrong, I like iPods too). Here's the pros and cons PROS: -Durable(dropped it a couple of times and still works fine), and FEELS THOUGH! -Conveient to change volume/tracks and such -larg...More
After my mom bought this for me since March 2008, I've had a ball with it, and abandoned my iPod Nano(dont' get me wrong, I like iPods too). Here's the pros and cons PROS: -Durable(dropped it a couple of times and still works fine), and FEELS THOUGH! -Conveient to change volume/tracks and such -large screen -very colorful -suits well for both men and women CONS: -short battery life(ARGH! Blast your music and the battery chart empties faster than a Bugatti can empty it's fuel tank at 250 mph!) -needs special adapter jack(included) for standard earphones(unless you use THEIR included earphones which has their own sized jack, this is a marketing gig among greedy corperations mesmerized by money) -Way to open back of phone could be better -Camera quality is WORSE than Hannah Montana's ego Less
Amazon

Decent Phone

from Amazon
While looking for a new phone, I was surprised by reviews I found for the phones I was interested in. I decided to search for reviews for the phone I already own to see what people said and see if the usual complaints were the same for many phones. Turns out they are and maybe people are overreacting t...More
While looking for a new phone, I was surprised by reviews I found for the phones I was interested in. I decided to search for reviews for the phone I already own to see what people said and see if the usual complaints were the same for many phones. Turns out they are and maybe people are overreacting to some things or possibly need to treat their phones better. I've had this phone for years and it's always done fine. I love the music player because then I never needed to buy an iPod; though, if you love music, get an iPod. This phone won't do it for you. Still, the phone's good for casual listening, and I love that I can move music from my computer straight to the phone with the USB cord it came with. You can't really sort your music though, so if you need real organization, this phone is not for you. As for battery life, my phone lasts for at least four days before I need to charge it. I rarely let it go that long, but often I let it go for a couple days while I'm at my boyfriend's away from the charger. I talk a lot and listen to music a lot too, always texting. The battery has never been an issue. The screen could get scratched. Mine still looks fine after years, no hideous scratches. I've dropped it many times (as I do with many things) and the phone is still fine. I even dropped it into cream cheese frosting and thank goodness it lasted through that! Maybe I lucked out and never hit my screen...though after two or so years, that's not really luck--that's more like a miracle! The phone can be quiet, but that doesn't bother me. At my parents I go into a quieter room and if I'm out somewhere, like a store, I have no problems. I just wish I could hear better in the car. On the highway, the tires can get too loud. People always hear me fine. Though recently the phone started echoing what I was saying but I think that's because of the frosting I dropped it in. It only echoes at me, not the person I'm talking to. The camera is pretty bad. I don't use the camera much, but I do like how easy it is to move pictures I take to my computer. If you want a camera phone, don't buy this phone. It's more like a phone that just happens to have a little camera--not really a camera phone. Texting is good. It's like any other phone. The phone holds a lot of texts, 2200+ before it starts to act weird or mess with the music player. One time I did have a crazy amount of texts piled up and it started interfering with my phone's ability to read the music. It kept telling me wrong artists and song titles--I thought it broke! But then I cleared my messages and everything was good again. If you're not picky, this phone is good. If you want a phone to wow you and be perfect and do amazing things, get something else (it'll be hard to find something that good). Less
Amazon

5300

from Amazon
I just recieved my phone today from [...] and i was disappoint because it didnt come with everything it claim it suppose to come with like the usb cable cord, headsets,etc. All i got was the phone, charger,maual which is fine. Hopefully i hope have any problems with the phone because the phone is nice...More
I just recieved my phone today from [...] and i was disappoint because it didnt come with everything it claim it suppose to come with like the usb cable cord, headsets,etc. All i got was the phone, charger,maual which is fine. Hopefully i hope have any problems with the phone because the phone is nice so far and i like it but i wish it had came with everything it said it would because i looking forward to putting music on the phone but i got to wait later to do that. Less
Yahoo

Good

from Yahoo
Pro: Good Media Player Con: LCD will break soon, need to be careful Nokia 5300 is a good phone.ease to use. Media player is good.But i broke my LCD within a year. Replacement coast of LCD is as same as phone charge.
Amazon

Impressive Phone

from Amazon
I got this phone as part of a bargain when i joined Tmobile. It had all the features that i wanted in a phone: a good camera,music player,FM radio and a nice design. The phone has reached my expectations thus far, i've had it for about 18 months and i've dropped it countless times,yet all i've had to d...More
I got this phone as part of a bargain when i joined Tmobile. It had all the features that i wanted in a phone: a good camera,music player,FM radio and a nice design. The phone has reached my expectations thus far, i've had it for about 18 months and i've dropped it countless times,yet all i've had to do each time is pick it up and it works like all is well; so it maintains the ruggedness that i expect from a Nokia phone. The voice command option is extremely disappointing as it never understood me when i tried using it. The back may be hard to open but i don't see that as a problem since i don't need to open it all the time. The radio is really impressive as well with very good reception most of the time. The phone has a lot of memory space. Cell phone reception is very clear and serves its purpose as a communication device. The 1GB memory card is a huge plus for storage. Data transfer is very easy and quick. Its easy to make changes to settings and you receive all your messages as soon as they get sent. The functions of the phone are easy to understand and the use. Unfortunately, the headphones that come with the phone do not last long before they become useless- at least in my case. In conclusion, its a pretty good cellphone if you don't expect the world from it. It comes at a good price and i would totally recommend it for a friend. Even after over a year, i still have no major issues with the phone. Less
Amazon

screen broke after falling on the CARPET

from Amazon
I thought I liked the phone a lot after I got it brand new from T-mobile. Then it dropped on the CARPET of my apartment, from the dining room table (a very short distance) and the screen went black. I had only used it for 3 days. T-mobile did not refund or replace the phone...
Amazon

Eh

from Amazon
I got this phone awhile back and replaced it fast because it kept freezing and I'd have to take the battery off to restart it. My phone recently broke and I'm back to using this one again and realizes why I avoided it in the first place. Picture Messaging - never works, always says network failure Te...More
I got this phone awhile back and replaced it fast because it kept freezing and I'd have to take the battery off to restart it. My phone recently broke and I'm back to using this one again and realizes why I avoided it in the first place. Picture Messaging - never works, always says network failure Text Messaging - it doesnt seem to save new words so its quite annoying to have to type a frequently used word that it does not recognize Calls - good. no problems here. Overall - sometimes the phone itself just freezes and the option to switch off doesnt allow you to choose it. Less
Amazon

The Worst NOKIA I've owned

from Amazon
I am a faithful Nokia customer, and this has been the worst phone I have ever owned. I've had the phone just over a year, and have nothing but trouble with it. I think I may have gotten a "lemon" but even so, the text message set up on this phone is really not user friendly. You have to go through m...More
I am a faithful Nokia customer, and this has been the worst phone I have ever owned. I've had the phone just over a year, and have nothing but trouble with it. I think I may have gotten a "lemon" but even so, the text message set up on this phone is really not user friendly. You have to go through more menus than previous (and older) Nokias just to send a text message, even when using the "shortcuts." And it rarely remembers the spellings that I save into the phone, so I constantly have to retype my friend's names, and words I use all the time. I tried using the music player but it required using some questionable software, and installing it on my computer, which I did not want to do. The songs that came preloaded on the phone go off at random... The music just starts playing. After one year, my phone does not ring consistently. Sometimes it just lights up if I have a call, or gives off a garbled ring. It has zero water damage, it's just a crappy phone. It also only came with a few ring tones, which seems strange considering it was fairly expensive last year. I would never buy this phone again or recommend it to someone else. Bummer. Less
Yahoo

cell phone

from Yahoo
Pro: former Con: no this cell phone is good or me
Yahoo

Nokia 5300 XPressmusic

from Yahoo
Pro: mp3 player and radio Con: good quality and durable the phone should be of good quality and durable at the sometime it should have mp3player and radio

5300 XpressMusic Videos