Helpful Links

Official WebsiteFacebook


Reviews (6/10 Avg. rating)


Tracy and Matt

This will make you consider buying a UMPC

Viliv S5

from Tracy and Matt

Viliv have really gone to town on the S5 and come up with something that could be quite special. The software package is a little bit rough around the edges, but the hardware itself is fantastic. Software, of course, is fairly easy to fix anyway and an alternative keyboard might be a cheap fix as well.
I really didn’t think I’d get on with an UMPC device, but as soon as I opened the box I was impressed with the build quality of the kit, and the styling. I realise this is a small market, but if you are after a UMPC, go get this one!

Read full review

Viliv have really gone to town on the S5 and come up with something that could be quite special. The software package is a little bit rough around the edges, but the hardware itself is fantastic. Software, of course, is fairly easy to fix anyway and an alternative keyboard might be a cheap fix as well.
I really didn’t think I’d get on with an UMPC device, but as soon as I opened the box I was impressed with the build quality of the kit, and the styling. I realise this is a small market, but if you are after a UMPC, go get this one!

Read full review

Less

Laptop Magazine

A compelling but pricey mobile internet device

Viliv S5

Laptop Magazine

Priced at $799, our configuration of the Viliv S5 is pricier than the $299 Clarion MiND, and twice as expensive as most netbooks. With that premium, however, comes a highly portable design, GPS, a sharp (though reflective) display, optional 3G connectivity, and impressive endurance. Touch and stylus novices may be put off by the lack of a physical keyboard, but if you want a pocketable PC and don’t mind the two-handed operation—or the price—the Viliv S5 will satisfy.

Read full review

Priced at $799, our configuration of the Viliv S5 is pricier than the $299 Clarion MiND, and twice as expensive as most netbooks. With that premium, however, comes a highly portable design, GPS, a sharp (though reflective) display, optional 3G connectivity, and impressive endurance. Touch and stylus novices may be put off by the lack of a physical keyboard, but if you want a pocketable PC and don’t mind the two-handed operation—or the price—the Viliv S5 will satisfy.

Read full review

Less

PC Magazine

It's too expensive that you'll opt to buy a couple of netbooks instead

Viliv S5

from PC Magazine

The only reason you should even consider the Viliv S5 Premium is because the best alternative—the OQO model 02—is on its way out. It runs a full-blown operating system and is more pocket-able than a standard netbook. However, the same reason why the model 02 didn't work out will eventually be true of the S5: the virtual haptic keyboard is almost unusable, performance is not up to par. Plus, these days $800 can buy you two netbooks.

Read full review

The only reason you should even consider the Viliv S5 Premium is because the best alternative—the OQO model 02—is on its way out. It runs a full-blown operating system and is more pocket-able than a standard netbook. However, the same reason why the model 02 didn't work out will eventually be true of the S5: the virtual haptic keyboard is almost unusable, performance is not up to par. Plus, these days $800 can buy you two netbooks.

Read full review

Less

TechCrunch

You can't help but get impressed with the X70 EX

Viliv X70 EX

from TechCrunch

I love the X70. I have never, ever been so impressed with a gadget, computer or otherwise. I think what amazes me the most is the price. You can get a full computing experience, with all of its pros and cons, in a truly portable package for only $600.

Now, as much as I love the X70 as a computer, I should point out that I’m not entirely impressed with it as a dedicated web browsing device. Internet performance is just one shot under par and the low-end Intel GMA 500 kills most Internet video sites. I know this sounds like a shameless plug but I totally mean it when I say you may want to wait for the CrunchPad if you want a tablet for just Internet usage.

However, the X70 is a full fledge computer that’s loaded with 3G wireless, a fast SSD, GPS, WiFi, and Windows XP. A lot of people like me are willing to forgo a bit of usability for all the extras that come with this Viliv. It has issues to work out like the video performance and quirky buttons, but my goodness it’s a heck of a computer.

Read full review

I love the X70. I have never, ever been so impressed with a gadget, computer or otherwise. I think what amazes me the most is the price. You can get a full computing experience, with all of its pros and cons, in a truly portable package for only $600.

Now, as much as I love the X70 as a computer, I should point out that I’m not entirely impressed with it as a dedicated web browsing device. Internet performance is just one shot under par and the low-end Intel GMA 500 kills most Internet video sites. I know this sounds like a shameless plug but I totally mean it when I say you may want to wait for the CrunchPad if you want a tablet for just Internet usage.

However, the X70 is a full fledge computer that’s loaded with 3G wireless, a fast SSD, GPS, WiFi, and Windows XP. A lot of people like me are willing to forgo a bit of usability for all the extras that come with this Viliv. It has issues to work out like the video performance and quirky buttons, but my goodness it’s a heck of a computer.

Read full review

Less

CNET

Too large to be a smart device, too small to be a useful Netbook

Viliv S5

from CNET

We played with an import model of the Viliv S5 and, while its performance is close to a full-size Netbook, the cost--$599--is at the upper end of the Netbook range. A similarly spec'd 10.1-inch Netbook would only cost $300, half the cost of this device. With the extra cash, you could purchase an iPod Touch for your portable media viewing. For $100 to $200 less, the S5 would be a far more compelling tweener machine, although it's already impressive that Viliv offers this palm-size PC at a fraction of the cost of UMPCs that came before it.

Read full review

We played with an import model of the Viliv S5 and, while its performance is close to a full-size Netbook, the cost--$599--is at the upper end of the Netbook range. A similarly spec'd 10.1-inch Netbook would only cost $300, half the cost of this device. With the extra cash, you could purchase an iPod Touch for your portable media viewing. For $100 to $200 less, the S5 would be a far more compelling tweener machine, although it's already impressive that Viliv offers this palm-size PC at a fraction of the cost of UMPCs that came before it.

Read full review

Less

UMPC Porttal

You'll run out of words to describe how good this device is

Viliv X70 EX

from UMPC Porttal

High quality. Great battery life. Excellent build. Class leading portability. Fast, high quality web browsing. High-end video quality and a good range of accessories is exactly what we said about the Viliv S5 but it applies to the X70 EX too. With the X70 you sacrifice some portability for an improved user experience, SD card slot, web cam and built-in mic and in our opinion the X70 EX is a better Tablet-style solution than the S5 unless you need the smallest form factor possible. It covers more usage scenarios with an easier user experience.
It has to be said that, as with most UMPCs, the target market is scattered across a number of niche and early-adopter markets and doesn’t fit into the the traditional smartphone/laptop, 2-device combination but for pro-mobile users, people wanting the fastest and richest mobile internet experience in the smallest 7” screen package, there really is no comparison. The Q1 Ultra Premium or Q1 Ultra 3G is definitely a competitor but the Viliv X70 EX introduces great value for money on top of everything that the Q1 U series can do and in the case of the Premium Air model we have here, earns the title of the best 7” Tablet UMPC we’ve ever tested.

Read full review

High quality. Great battery life. Excellent build. Class leading portability. Fast, high quality web browsing. High-end video quality and a good range of accessories is exactly what we said about the Viliv S5 but it applies to the X70 EX too. With the X70 you sacrifice some portability for an improved user experience, SD card slot, web cam and built-in mic and in our opinion the X70 EX is a better Tablet-style solution than the S5 unless you need the smallest form factor possible. It covers more usage scenarios with an easier user experience.
It has to be said that, as with most UMPCs, the target market is scattered across a number of niche and early-adopter markets and doesn’t fit into the the traditional smartphone/laptop, 2-device combination but for pro-mobile users, people wanting the fastest and richest mobile internet experience in the smallest 7” screen package, there really is no comparison. The Q1 Ultra Premium or Q1 Ultra 3G is definitely a competitor but the Viliv X70 EX introduces great value for money on top of everything that the Q1 U series can do and in the case of the Premium Air model we have here, earns the title of the best 7” Tablet UMPC we’ve ever tested.

Read full review

Less

PCWorld

Disappointing 3G support and an awkward software keyboard make it less than ideal for everyday use

Viliv S5

from PCWorld

As UMPCs go, the Viliv S5 delivers on many of its promises, although the disappointing 3G performance will deter some people and the software keyboard makes it a poor choice for anyone who frequently wrangles Office documents. But for $599, you can get a nice, lightweight netbook. I recommend checking out the Viliv only if you absolutely must have a 1-pound Windows PC that works well with Wi-Fi, and you're not expecting to do a lot of typing.

Read full review

As UMPCs go, the Viliv S5 delivers on many of its promises, although the disappointing 3G performance will deter some people and the software keyboard makes it a poor choice for anyone who frequently wrangles Office documents. But for $599, you can get a nice, lightweight netbook. I recommend checking out the Viliv only if you absolutely must have a 1-pound Windows PC that works well with Wi-Fi, and you're not expecting to do a lot of typing.

Read full review

Less

Gizmodo

It's an amazing device, but it wouldn't really matter for someone who doesn't like MIDs

Viliv S5

from Gizmodo

The S5 is a good value, but you may not like it anyway.
At .92lbs, the Viliv is a bit hefty in your hands even though it's 1.5lbs lighter than most netbooks. Still, the Viliv kept surprising me with its speed. Loaded with the same processor as the Vaio P, the system doesn't actually run XP faster than any Atom-based, but to see installation bars and downloads move so quickly on such a tiny device is always a bit of a mindfrak.
The resistive touchscreen has passable color, brightness and contrast—luckily, it's also ridiculously accurate. Yeah, the buttons and icons are as minuscule as you'd expect, but I never had a hard time, say, hitting the "X" to close a window (with my precision "nail" tool, of course)...unless my browser was full screen. Then my finger just never fit in the corner properly. For when you need extreme precision, the four-way thumbstick doubles as a mouse, or you can use the bundled "Cube" interface for larger icons.
As for the keyboard, it pops up with a conveniently placed button on the right. Pressing keys offers a satisfying moment of haptic feedback. It works about 90% of the time, but however the keyboard skin was designed, your finger press sometimes goes through the keyboard and hits a link or something that's on your screen. It can make typing a simple phrase quite taxing as you unintentionally swap text boxes.
The GPS? It works, but you'll need to supply your own nav software (an additional cost). The battery? It's rated at 6 hours, but we received four hours (and two minutes) when tested with nonstop WMV playback (Wi-Fi on with the screen at medium brightness). Since many manufacturers claim battery life that's double actual testing, I considered four hours to be decent.
The USB, headphone and Multi I/O ports are enough in a device of this size, because between them, you could plug in a keyboard, monitor (with adapter) and speakers. In this respect, the Viliv could make for an extremely portable home-to-office computer.
Here's the issue: I just don't like MIDs. I hate them, really. If I want to use something small, I'll use a smartphone. If I want to use something slightly bigger, that's netbook/laptop territory. The MID, in my mind, is a failed idea of the future still stuck in the 90s. It's a computer that neither fits in your pocket nor serves as your main computer. So if you hate MIDs, the Viliv S5 won't do anything to change that.

Read full review

The S5 is a good value, but you may not like it anyway.
At .92lbs, the Viliv is a bit hefty in your hands even though it's 1.5lbs lighter than most netbooks. Still, the Viliv kept surprising me with its speed. Loaded with the same processor as the Vaio P, the system doesn't actually run XP faster than any Atom-based, but to see installation bars and downloads move so quickly on such a tiny device is always a bit of a mindfrak.
The resistive touchscreen has passable color, brightness and contrast—luckily, it's also ridiculously accurate. Yeah, the buttons and icons are as minuscule as you'd expect, but I never had a hard time, say, hitting the "X" to close a window (with my precision "nail" tool, of course)...unless my browser was full screen. Then my finger just never fit in the corner properly. For when you need extreme precision, the four-way thumbstick doubles as a mouse, or you can use the bundled "Cube" interface for larger icons.
As for the keyboard, it pops up with a conveniently placed button on the right. Pressing keys offers a satisfying moment of haptic feedback. It works about 90% of the time, but however the keyboard skin was designed, your finger press sometimes goes through the keyboard and hits a link or something that's on your screen. It can make typing a simple phrase quite taxing as you unintentionally swap text boxes.
The GPS? It works, but you'll need to supply your own nav software (an additional cost). The battery? It's rated at 6 hours, but we received four hours (and two minutes) when tested with nonstop WMV playback (Wi-Fi on with the screen at medium brightness). Since many manufacturers claim battery life that's double actual testing, I considered four hours to be decent.
The USB, headphone and Multi I/O ports are enough in a device of this size, because between them, you could plug in a keyboard, monitor (with adapter) and speakers. In this respect, the Viliv could make for an extremely portable home-to-office computer.
Here's the issue: I just don't like MIDs. I hate them, really. If I want to use something small, I'll use a smartphone. If I want to use something slightly bigger, that's netbook/laptop territory. The MID, in my mind, is a failed idea of the future still stuck in the 90s. It's a computer that neither fits in your pocket nor serves as your main computer. So if you hate MIDs, the Viliv S5 won't do anything to change that.

Read full review

Less

Pocketables

It's impossible not to love it unless you hate the slate-style form factor

Viliv S5

from Pocketables

Mobile computing is about personal choice. We all have different wants and needs, so no single device can satisfy us all; a dealbreaker for one person could have no effect on a purchasing decision for another.  The Viliv S5 Premium has so much going for it (build quality, performance, battery life, size/weight, versatility, price, etc.) that at a glance, it would seem almost impossible for anyone not to love it, want it, and buy it. But here I stand, fully aware of how remarkable the S5 is and why so many consumers can't wait to have one as their own, yet still not wanting one as my own. The dealbreaker for me, personally, is the form factor. I just prefer slider and clamshell UMPCs/MIDs with hardware keyboards: simple as that. If, however, the slate style appeals to you, then you'd be hard-pressed to find anything better than the Viliv S5.

Read full review

Mobile computing is about personal choice. We all have different wants and needs, so no single device can satisfy us all; a dealbreaker for one person could have no effect on a purchasing decision for another.  The Viliv S5 Premium has so much going for it (build quality, performance, battery life, size/weight, versatility, price, etc.) that at a glance, it would seem almost impossible for anyone not to love it, want it, and buy it. But here I stand, fully aware of how remarkable the S5 is and why so many consumers can't wait to have one as their own, yet still not wanting one as my own. The dealbreaker for me, personally, is the form factor. I just prefer slider and clamshell UMPCs/MIDs with hardware keyboards: simple as that. If, however, the slate style appeals to you, then you'd be hard-pressed to find anything better than the Viliv S5.

Read full review

Less

Darn, there are no reviews yet for this manufacturer.


Viliv Question?

Visit the Viliv Q&A Forum to get answers, ask a question or help others.