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Sony Reader Wi-Fi review

6.7/10 AVG.
RATING



6.7/10
Informr score
The Sony Reader Wi-Fi currently has an Informr score of 6.7 out of 10. This score is based on our evaluation of 10 sources including reviews from users and the web's most trusted critics.

The Sony Reader Wi-Fi is one of the latest e-book readers to become available in the Sony stable. It is available in the 6-inch form factor and comes with built-in Wi-Fi connectivity. Judging from the design alone you will be able to tell that it is a Sony product and comes with the quality that is normally associated with the Sony brand. But is this the best choice for those who are looking for an easy-to-use e-book reader that offers an experience without compromise?

While it doesn’t come pre-loaded with tons of features like many other electronic products available on the market today, the Reader Wi-Fi comes with just the right amount of hardware and software elements necessary to make it a nice modern device for reading e-books. As mentioned earlier, it comes with built-in Wi-Fi, and also features a 6-inch 600x800 pixel resolution touchscreen display on which users can read e-books in a number of different formats. It supports EPUB, PDF, and TXTdocuments, and these can all be downloaded onto the device itself through a wireless connection.

It has a built-in microSD card slot for extra storage space. And the built-in battery lasts over half a day of continuous reading per full charge. Standby time is rated for up to 30 days, so you don’t have to worry about charging the Sony Reader Wi-Fi every single day if you only do a couple of hours of reading when you get some time to spare.

There are many ways to enjoy using the Sony Reader Wi-Fi. Not only does it have a touchscreen display for navigation, it also comes with a set of hardware buttons sitting right below the screen itself. But though you might expect it to make things hassle-free as far as making your way around the books and the menus is concerned, most reviewers note that the overall performance of the Reader seems rather sluggish. So sure, you may be able to put the Sony Reader Wi-Fi to plenty of good use, but your mileage may vary.

Need to Know: Sony Reader Wi-Fi

1. Comes with a 6-inch 600x800 pixel resolution touchscreen e-ink display. (The Good)

2. Included battery offers up to 30 days of standby time. (The Good)

3. Performance seems sluggish when it comes to navigating menus and reading books in certain formats. (The Bad)

4. Accompanying content ecosystem is not as robust as those of the competition. (The Bad)


Screen Size
6"
Storage
1.3 GB
3G
No
Reading Time
672 hours


What the Critics Are Saying...


148Apps

Planet Hop‘s presentation is nonexistent and there’s barely anything to its gameplay. But there’s no denying that what is here works. Players that approach it as the semi-experiment in twitch minimalism that it seems to be will find a quirky new way to kill time and chase high scor...

- Jordan Minor, 148Apps
PCWorld

The Sony Reader Wi-Fi lacks the menu finesse and social media hooks that Barnes & Noble's Nook Simple Touch boasts. But its new pricing puts it right in line with its e-reader competition, and as a result it's an attractive choice, especially for people who prize light weight, navigation flexibi...

- Melissa J. Perenson, PCWorld
TrustedReviews

With its sleek lines and alluring finish, the Samsung Series 7 Slate 700T is the most attractive Windows 7 tablet going. It’s also the most powerful, and the one with the best accessories thanks to its included Wacom stylus, media dock and wireless keyboard. Unfortunately, it suffers from some...

- Ardjuna Seghers, TrustedReviews
Gear Diary

The big question here is, who is the audience for this device? If you are an ebook enthusiast, enjoy finding books from multiple sources, and you’re looking for something you can tweak to your heart’s content, this is a great choice at an affordable price. However, if you’re lookin...

- Carly Z, Gear Diary
Computer Shopper

The PRS-T1, priced more competitively than previous Sony e-readers, is a genuine alternative to the Kindle and Nook families, given its light-but-sturdy build, extensive reading controls, and audio/Web functions. Whatever the Sony Reader Wi-Fi PRS-T1 lacks in terms of social-media and cloud integra...

- Dave McClintock, Computer Shopper


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Screen Size
6"

The Sony Reader Wi-Fi's screen size is 6 inches with 600 x 800 pixels resolution.

Backlight
Yes

There is a built-in backlight for reading in the dark.

Storage
1.3 GB

Internal memory is 1.3 GB. An external, MicroSD, MicroSDHC (up to 32 GB) expansion slot is available for increased storage capacity.

3G
No

This model has no 3G wireless capabilities.

Reading Time
672 hours
Battery life is rated for up to 30 days standby time according to Sony's.

Reader Wi-Fi Specs

Overview
Release date September 30, 2011
Regions available Canada
Networks
No cellular data
SIM card No
Operating System Other
Processor No
Internal Flash Memory 1.3 GB
RAM No
ROM No
Flightmode No
TTY/TDD No
SAR Unknown
Languages English
Manufacturer Warranty 1 Year
Accessories Included AC Charger, Data Cable, Manual, Standard Battery, Stylus
Power & battery
Battery Capacity 1000 mAh
Removable Battery Yes
Wireless Charging No
Fast Charging No
Battery Charge Time 2 hours
Reading Time Up to: 672 hours
Standby Time Up to: 30 days
Physical Characteristics
Material Plastic
Colors Black, Red, White
Dimensions [H x W x D] 11.0 x 17.3 x 0.9 cm (4.3 x 6.8 x 0.4 in)
Weight 167 grams
Water Resistant / Waterproof Unknown
Rugged design No
IP Rating No
Display / Screen
Type Grayscale
Technology E-ink
Colors Unknown
Resolution 600 x 800 pixels
Pixel density Unknown
Size 6 inches
Backlit Illumination Yes
Zoom / Magnification Yes
Screen Orientation Lock No
Multi-Touch No
Fingerprint-Resistant Coating No
Anti Glare No
Additional Display Features -
Input / Navigation
Touchscreen Yes
Sleep / Wake Key No
Home Key Yes
Page Turn Key No
Physical keyboard No
Text-to-Speech No
Screen Reader No
Keypad/Screen Lock No
External Volume Control No
Fingerprint Sensor No
Web / Email / Messaging
Web Browser Yes
Connectivity
USB Yes
USB OTG Support No
Infrared No
Bluetooth No
WiFi 802.11 b/g/n
WiFi Encryption No
Memory Expansion Slot Yes
Expansion Slot Info MicroSD, MicroSDHC
PC Synchronization Yes
DLNA Support No
NFC No
Audio / Video
Audio Playback No
Audio Formats No
Video Playback No
Video Playback Formats No
Streaming Video No
External Speakers Yes
Headset Jack Yes
Vibration Alert No
Content Formats Supported
Content Formats Supported No
More
Additional comments Other Names (AKA): Sony Reader PRS-T1

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Critic Reviews


148Apps

As empty and unforgiving as space itself

from 148Apps

Planet Hop‘s presentation is nonexistent and there’s barely anything to its gameplay. But there’s no denying that what is here works. Players that approach it as the semi-experiment in twitch minimalism that it seems to be will find a quirky new way to kill time and chase high scores.

Read full review

Planet Hop‘s presentation is nonexistent and there’s barely anything to its gameplay. But there’s no denying that what is here works. Players that approach it as the semi-experiment in twitch minimalism that it seems to be will find a quirky new way to kill time and chase high scores.

Read full review

Less

PCWorld

Light weight makes it conducive for one-handed use but occasionally feels sluggish

from PCWorld

The Sony Reader Wi-Fi lacks the menu finesse and social media hooks that Barnes & Noble's Nook Simple Touch boasts. But its new pricing puts it right in line with its e-reader competition, and as a result it's an attractive choice, especially for people who prize light weight, navigation flexibility, and easy access to reading text PDFs.

Read full review

The Sony Reader Wi-Fi lacks the menu finesse and social media hooks that Barnes & Noble's Nook Simple Touch boasts. But its new pricing puts it right in line with its e-reader competition, and as a result it's an attractive choice, especially for people who prize light weight, navigation flexibility, and easy access to reading text PDFs.

Read full review

Less

TrustedReviews

Most powerful Windows 7 tablet with beautiful PLS screen

from TrustedReviews

With its sleek lines and alluring finish, the Samsung Series 7 Slate 700T is the most attractive Windows 7 tablet going. It’s also the most powerful, and the one with the best accessories thanks to its included Wacom stylus, media dock and wireless keyboard. Unfortunately, it suffers from s...More

With its sleek lines and alluring finish, the Samsung Series 7 Slate 700T is the most attractive Windows 7 tablet going. It’s also the most powerful, and the one with the best accessories thanks to its included Wacom stylus, media dock and wireless keyboard. Unfortunately, it suffers from some build-quality issues; its otherwise gorgeous PLS screen doesn’t have the ideal aspect ratio for a tablet, and despite Samsung’s enhancements, Windows still isn’t a finger-friendly OS. However, if you need the productivity only Microsoft’s system can provide, or if you’re a designer/artist looking for a mobile digital solution, it’s the best option currently available.

Read full review

Less

Gear Diary

Build quality is excellent but sluggish screen refresh

from Gear Diary

The big question here is, who is the audience for this device? If you are an ebook enthusiast, enjoy finding books from multiple sources, and you’re looking for something you can tweak to your heart’s content, this is a great choice at an affordable price. However, if you’re loo...More

The big question here is, who is the audience for this device? If you are an ebook enthusiast, enjoy finding books from multiple sources, and you’re looking for something you can tweak to your heart’s content, this is a great choice at an affordable price. However, if you’re looking for an ebook reader you can hand someone without compromise, and without them needing to reach for a computer or manual…this isn’t necessarily it. I want to emphasize, it’s a nice device, but there’s many compromises that go along with the standout features.

Read full review

Less

Computer Shopper

Lightweight, competitive price, sharp and dark display

from Computer Shopper

The PRS-T1, priced more competitively than previous Sony e-readers, is a genuine alternative to the Kindle and Nook families, given its light-but-sturdy build, extensive reading controls, and audio/Web functions.

Whatever the Sony Reader Wi-Fi PRS-T1 lacks in terms of social-media and cloud integration (and mobile-app support), it makes up for with industry-leading portability, excellent reading controls, and decent secondary functions (audio and Web browsing, especially) for an E Ink-based e-reader....

More

The PRS-T1, priced more competitively than previous Sony e-readers, is a genuine alternative to the Kindle and Nook families, given its light-but-sturdy build, extensive reading controls, and audio/Web functions.

Whatever the Sony Reader Wi-Fi PRS-T1 lacks in terms of social-media and cloud integration (and mobile-app support), it makes up for with industry-leading portability, excellent reading controls, and decent secondary functions (audio and Web browsing, especially) for an E Ink-based e-reader.

While the narrow, button-free sides of the display frame take some getting used to, the overall design is intelligent and carefully engineered. Encouraged by Sony’s uncharacteristically competitive pricing on this model, we recommend the Reader Wi-Fi PRS-T1 to readers who want features comparable to the Amazon Kindle Touch, along with support for the widely accepted ePub format.

The PRS-T1, priced more competitively than previous Sony e-readers, is a genuine alternative to the Kindle and Nook families, given its light-but-sturdy build, extensive reading controls, and audio/Web functions.

Read full review

Less

Expert Reviews

Doesn't feel as sturdy, low weight and great contrast

from Expert Reviews

Sadly, the Reader lacks the Amazon Kindle's ability to save your place in a book across multiple devices, but we really like its Public Library service, the advanced touchscreen and music support. It's a shame that Sony's store isn't yet launched, making Kobo's eReader Touch slightly better value...More

Sadly, the Reader lacks the Amazon Kindle's ability to save your place in a book across multiple devices, but we really like its Public Library service, the advanced touchscreen and music support. It's a shame that Sony's store isn't yet launched, making Kobo's eReader Touch slightly better value, but if you want to read books and listen to music, it's the best choice, and wins an Ultimate award.

Read full review

Less

Techradar

Understated modern design, light and portable

from Techradar

The Sony Reader PRS-T1 is about the same weight as the much cheaper Amazon Kindle. We found that, for basic book reading, the Reader is a good option because the only time you'll notice any screen flicker is when you access the extra features such as the web browser

Pricing of ebooks matches what you will find in the Kindle store....

More

The Sony Reader PRS-T1 is about the same weight as the much cheaper Amazon Kindle. We found that, for basic book reading, the Reader is a good option because the only time you'll notice any screen flicker is when you access the extra features such as the web browser

Pricing of ebooks matches what you will find in the Kindle store.

But if you venture away from basic reading, the Amazon Kindle is a better choice - it is just as light, cheaper, and offers a wider selection of books. Also, the Kindle offers more storage space for books - about 2GB compared to the Reader's 1.3GB.

Read full review

Less

Techradar

A light and thin ebook reader that doesn't quite measure up to the competition

from Techradar

The Sony Reader PRS-T1 is about the same weight as the much cheaper Amazon Kindle. We found that, for basic book reading, the Reader is a good option because the only time you'll notice any screen flicker is when you access the extra features such as the web browser

Pricing of ebooks matches what you will find in the Kindle store....

More

The Sony Reader PRS-T1 is about the same weight as the much cheaper Amazon Kindle. We found that, for basic book reading, the Reader is a good option because the only time you'll notice any screen flicker is when you access the extra features such as the web browser

Pricing of ebooks matches what you will find in the Kindle store.

But if you venture away from basic reading, the Amazon Kindle is a better choice - it is just as light, cheaper, and offers a wider selection of books. Also, the Kindle offers more storage space for books - about 2GB compared to the Reader's 1.3GB.

Read full review

Less

The Gadgeteer

Checking out books is easy, albeit a bit slow

from The Gadgeteer

Apparently Sony has replaced their three previous models with the Reader Wi-Fi (PRS-T1), because it’s the only reader I see on their site. I think this is a really good reader and combines portability of the previous PRS-350 and PRS-650 models with the Wi-Fi connectivity of the PRS-950. I think the reader is a good size, but it would be a little easier to hold in a case. It also needs a light source for reading in a dark room. (Read my review of Sony’s lighted case for the PRS-T1.) Sony has made changes – plastic chassis instead of metal – to help bring the price in line with other eBook readers, but I don’t think they’ve compromised the quality of the reader....

More

Apparently Sony has replaced their three previous models with the Reader Wi-Fi (PRS-T1), because it’s the only reader I see on their site. I think this is a really good reader and combines portability of the previous PRS-350 and PRS-650 models with the Wi-Fi connectivity of the PRS-950. I think the reader is a good size, but it would be a little easier to hold in a case. It also needs a light source for reading in a dark room. (Read my review of Sony’s lighted case for the PRS-T1.) Sony has made changes – plastic chassis instead of metal – to help bring the price in line with other eBook readers, but I don’t think they’ve compromised the quality of the reader.

I like the Sony PRS-T1 Reader Wi-Fi and I find myself reading on it a lot lately. (I passed the Kindle along to my husband.) It’s much easier to hold for long periods than my iPad 2 is, and it doesn’t have other apps that lure me away from my book. If you’re looking for a good eBook reader with a clear screen, the ability to check out and read library books, and a screen you can read in bright sunlight, you can’t go wrong with the Sony PRS-T1 Reader Wi-Fi.

Read full review

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PC Magazine

Slim design, excellent contrast and attractive font choices

So the Reader Wi-Fi itself is mostly a winner, even if the Sony Reader Store could still use improvement. At this point, Sony finally has the right hardware and pricing; now it's a matter of whether the company can catch up with the competition. The Amazon Kindle, our current Editors' Choice for...More

So the Reader Wi-Fi itself is mostly a winner, even if the Sony Reader Store could still use improvement. At this point, Sony finally has the right hardware and pricing; now it's a matter of whether the company can catch up with the competition. The Amazon Kindle, our current Editors' Choice for ebook readers, lacks a touch screen, and you need to spend $30 extra if you want an ad-free version. But even that Kindle is still $40 less expensive than the Reader Wi-Fi, and Amazon also offers a more comprehensive book store and digital app ecosystem. (The Amazon Kindle Touch would be a better comparison because of its touch screen, but that model isn't out yet; we'll review the Kindle Touch separately as soon as it's available.) The stubby B&N Nook Touch is another solid alternative; while it's a little larger and heavier, B&N has also done a better job with its own ebook store, and B&N also has iPhone and iPad apps available for the Nook.

Read full review

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